Histomobile is the ultimate library of car pictures, videos, and more than 3.000.000 specifications ! | Create account | Log in

Car wallpapers and specifications

EN
FR
On Histomobile.com : 1310 manufacturers, 31115 cars, 44199 pictures, 50330 news in english

Manufacturers / U.K. / Jaguar


:
GalleryNewsHistory Links Auctions Production
Jaguar vehicles


1920


Like Porsche and Ferrari, Jaguar’s success was driven by one man, William Lyons. The young Lyons emerged as a "side car" maker in the 20’s. "Side car" is the additional passenger compartment attached to the side of motorcycle. Of course, that couldn’t fulfil Lyons’ ambition. Therefore he started building his own car based on the mass production Austin Seven or Morris but with his own chassis and body.


1930


SS
Jaguar SS One serie 1  (1931)

The Swallow Sidecar Company had moved from its roots making stylish sidecars to become first a coachbuilder adding new bodies to other makers chassis and running gear and in 1932 launched a car of its own, the SS1. It had also moved in 1928 from Blackpool to Coventry, in the heart of the British motor industry.

Under the guidance of the chairman, William Lyons, the company survived the depression years by making a series of beautifully styled cars offering exceptional value for money although some enthusiasts criticised them at the time for being "more show than go". The engines and chassis were supplied by the Standard Motor Company with a large design input to the latter from SS with the bodywork being added in the Coventry works. The engines were modified to designs by William Heynes and Harry Weslake.

The first of the SS range of cars was the 1932 SS1 with 2 or 2.5 Litre side valve, six cylinder engine. Initially available as coupé or tourer a saloon was added in 1934 when the chassis was modified to be 2 inches (50 mm) wider. The smaller engined SSII joined the range in 1932.

SS
Jaguar SS One Tourer concept (1931)

The first of the sports cars came in 1935 with the SS90, so called because of its 90 mph top speed, but after only 23 had been made it was replaced in 1936 by the Jaguar SS100, the first car to bear the new name. One of the finest looking cars of all time, only 198 of the 2.5 Litre and 116 of the 3.5 Litre models were made and with a 100 mph top speed and 0-60 mph time of 11 seconds the survivors are highly sought after, rarely coming on the market.

The mainstream production would always be the saloons and in 1936 the 1.5 Litre was launched with 4 cylinder side valve engine, replaced by an overhead valve model in 1938. Alongside this was the 2.5 Litre saloon with 6 cylinder engine and overhead valve from the start. It was upgraded in 1938 including a new chassis and optional 3.5 Litre engine.

Car production stopped in 1940 and would restart in 1945 under the new name but initially making the pre-war 1.5, 2.5 and 3.5 Litre saloons. The sidecar making business along with the Swallow trademark was sold, the new company making the Swallow Doretti sports car.

SS
Jaguar SS Two concept (1932)

In 1945 the company changed its name to Jaguar Cars Ltd.


1940


MK
Jaguar MK IV  concept (1945)

In 1948, that was the fastest production car.

The XK120 stunned the world by its high performance out of a low price. Its good look, styled by Lyons himself, also helped attracting sales from all over the world. That fulfilled the post-war British government’s policy to concentrate on export. Some 12,000 units were sold until 1954, then it was upgraded to XK140 and then XK150.


1950


MK
Jaguar MK VII  concept (1950)

Entered the 50’s, Jaguar also started producing saloon with the launch of Mk VII. Despite of powering by the same XK engine, the sales of big saloons were not very successful. Therefore Lyons tried a smaller saloon, then improved to Mk II. The Mk II’s smaller body accompaned with the powerful XK engine and classical styling won the love from car enthusiasts. Production totalled 123,000 cars and became the best selling Jaguar until XJ6. It also won touring car races.


1960


Type
Jaguar Type E (1) concept (1961)

The XK150 was succeeded by E-type in 1961. This beautiful sports car was once recorded a top speed of 150mph and was (again) the fastest production sports car then. At least 70,000 E-types left the factory until 1975, including the version with a marvellous V12 designed by Walter Hassen.

Lyons was also interested in motor racing, especially is endurance races such as Le Mans. His own team won a total of 5 Le Mans - 2 by C-type (1951, 53), 3 by D-type (1955, 56, 57). After a rest of 2 decades, the partnership with TWR won another 2 Le Mans - XJR-9LM (1988), XJR-12 (1989) - and 2 World Sports Car Championships - XJR-8 (1987) and XJR-14 (1991).

In the production side, XJ6 arrived in 1968 and its evolution still serves the company today.


1970


Type
Jaguar Type E (3) 2 plus 2 concept (1971)

V12 was introduced into the saloon in 1972, the car named XJ12. During the 70’s the company’s reputation had been declining until the revival in the mid-90’s. The retirement of Sir William Lyons in ’72 was probably one of the reasons. (He passed away in 1985) Jaguar was losing money and once absorbed by British Leyland. It resumed independence in 1984 but the new cars had already became less attractive than the Lyons’ era. The XJ-S of 1975 was a design disaster. The build quality and production efficiency were not improved.


1980


XJR
Jaguar XJR 5  concept (1980)

V12 was introduced into the saloon in 1972, the car named XJ12. During the 70’s the company’s reputation had been declining until the revival in the mid-90’s. The retirement of Sir William Lyons in ’72 was probably one of the reasons. (He passed away in 1985) Jaguar was losing money and once absorbed by British Leyland. It resumed independence in 1984 but the new cars had already became less attractive than the Lyons’ era. The XJ-S of 1975 was a design disaster. The build quality and production efficiency were not improved.


1990


XJR
Jaguar XJR 15  concept (1990)

In 1993, A new production line opened at Browns Lane and signalled the improvement of build quality. Then came the first new engine for 2 decades - the advanced AJ-V8, although it is produced in Ford’s engine plant. The launch of S-Type in 1998 should lift Jaguar to a position challenging BMW and Mercedes.



Idea and design © 1999-2016 van Damme Stéphane.




Terms Of Use / Privacy Policy | Contact

18